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Green Fools – Once Upon and Atom Bomb

A sketch I did after seeing Once Upon an Atom Bomb over a <a href="http://hubblesite.org/gallery/album/nebula/pr2009025l/xlarge_web/hires/true/">hubble image</a>.

There were two shows I really wanted to see this weekend – one was Race (Ground Zero / Hit and Myth), which didn’t happen, and the other was Once Upon an Atom Bomb by Jennie Esdale, Eric Rose, and David Rhymer. That one I did make it to (and I ran into Jenna Shummoogum, who has reviewed it here).

I really liked the show overall. The projections were absolute fantastic. They didn’t seem gimmicky, just magical. The only time they didn’t quite work for me was when the projections were on a curtain in front of the stage – I was at a bit of an oblique angle, so the folds in the curtain made it difficult to read (in some cases) and see what was going on when the projection was on  the curtain. But the projection mapping on the main set – which was kind of shaped like a vortex – was absolutely fantastic. There was one part where a black hole sucked up a house, and the projection mapping on the different parts of the set was amazing for that particularly. There was also some projection mapping in a puppet sequence that was also fantastic.

Vanessa Sabourin shone as a few characters, primarily Emily (I think), with Jed Tomlinson doing some awesome costume and puppet work which was the perfect mix of childlike and creepy. I also liked how the music (which Sabourin sang very well) was woven into the story. It was very engaging throughout and I liked the journey we took through the psyche of this little girl, and how it was connection to the setting, 1950’s America during bomb raid drills. Emily’s mother is a nuclear physicist and her father is a military man, but her home life explodes right during this time, when the world could have been expected to explode.

I also liked how hints of science came into the storyline. I am fascinated cosmology, and big bang cosmology has a lot to do with nuclear physics

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